• Johnnycash89
  • Billclinton87
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  • Hillarydaycare89
  • Swim_1
  • Rodeo
  • Cnnelectionnight2004
  • Myseatelection04
  • Electionnightnewsroom
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  • Dontyson89
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  • Protest
  • Seinenetangle
  • Taj
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  • Snake
  • Indiakidstoschool98
  • Indiamarket
 

« July 2006 | Main

September 23, 2006

Designing for Blogs, Part 1: A Brief Manifesto

I'm an unabashed fan of working smarter, not harder.

In 1999, before I first happened on blog software or even the precursor called "EditThisPage," I was working with a few student programmers on a similar system in PHP, for classroom uses, collaborative projects, and portfolio-based active learning. What I really wanted to do was get away from the limitations of WebCT and Blackboard for more student-centered learning, instead of reproducing traditional classroom structures online. And I didn't want to have to keep teaching students HTML in classes that had other work to do.

When I saw that EditThisPage, Radio Userland and other applications were already doing what I was attempting to build from scratch in my dining room, I realized that the idea was so simple and such a logical next step, hundreds of people were probably doing exactly what I was doing, in different arenas, to make publishing accessible to more people. I saw that I could use blog tools for just about anything I could imagine with HTML and Flash, and save myself a whole lot of work.

And why did the blog idea catch fire as the killer app, when content management systems on the corporate side were plentiful? I strongly believe the answer is a timely combination of the rise of Google along with RSS.

Even though feed readers are having difficulty reaching non-tech users, feeds and tags are becoming an intrinsic structure in nearly everything we build. Quite simply, I won't build another freelance/contract web site that is not RSS/Atom-enabled. It's a no-brainer. Blogs are the display and feeds give the display legs. Technorati.com would not exist without feeds. And the massive social movement that is the blogosphere would not exist at all without RSS behind it.

So these days, rather than endlessly re-inventing the wheel, I'm primarily designing for CSS and the content-management shell blog software provides, a shell I can pour nearly anything into. Do I ever wish for the old blank-slate, starting fresh with a new audience/user interaction model every time?

Sometimes, but Web functionality is so crucial to interactive communities and a public commons that solo work in Flash feels empty to me, like an essential piece is missing. I think we'll end up one day defining "interactivity" as something that essentially must have more than one author, perhaps even many authors.

And lately, when I want to push on the limits of what interactivity can do, I find myself reaching for an even more robust system, pmachine's Expression Engine, where I can situate multiple blog modules in different contexts on the same page, and still retain my permalink archives and flexible CSS designs.

My only complaint so far is that I want some of the features I find in Scoop, features of audience-driven, "self-organizing" sites.

Not too long ago, someone asked me to predict where interactive media and the Internet would be five years from now. I refused to give an answer, because I don't get to decide. The beauty of a grassroots, bottom-up social movement like in the blogosphere is that the social structures provide an organic kind of direction and structure, and the social structure is the authority, not "industry leaders" or "futurists" or any other professional prognosticators striving for control or a first-mover advantage.

Interactivity is about giving up control.

What I strive to do as a designer and a participant in this grassroots social movement is to create tools that empower the most people with enough freedom to set their own directions. I'm not interested in herding cats. I am interested in watching and learning inductively from where cats go.

That's what Web 2.0 is about. That's why it rose from the ashes of the top-down corporate- and VC-driven creations that crashed and burned after all the money turned to vapor. What we valued most was what remained. Communities, interactions, strong ties, weak ties. Rich relationships over time. Rabid flame wars. Not endlessly pitching widgets while dropping names to bugger your Google/Technorati rank.

That's also why, in what some are calling a Web boomlet, I see business people desperately trying to appropriate blogs for various business models, proclaiming themselves authorities on their blog content niche as if they were following a stock professional copywriting formula, many diluting content in search engine-optimized blog sites that literally suck all the life out of the real reasons for blogging, the real reasons for writing and communicating online.

They claim they are dispensing value in a kind of knowledge-log "how-to" format, but as this genre of blogging multiplies, the sites look to me like little more than human-written, SEO-focused link farms, one step away from machine-generated link farms. Where is the real value in that?

Where I will stand in this new wash-out is with the commons, the spaces where real people talk, where conversations are alive with an energy of their own. The interfaces I will build for these communities and cybercultures will be interfaces that allow patterns of use to co-create the interface structures themselves.

The most creative, edgy projects I want to work on compulsively on my own time will not just employ user-centered design. They will allow social network structures to literally create their own designs.

In part two on this topic, I offer a visual snapshot into the kinds of blog-based sites I design, build, and often, host. One got 2,500 hits in its first 48 hours online. Others get very little traffic, because they are e-books I'm committed to maintaining as part of our common online library. Others are simply labors of love, my own contribution to the "real."

September 23, 2006 in Portfolio, Projects, Web Design, Web/Tech, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Designing for Blogs, Part Two: Screenshots

Mediabloggers350

Atlanta Media Bloggers (launched 2006)
Link: www.serendipit-e.com/mediabloggers
Custom advanced CSS on the Typepad platform. Original artwork by Denny Lester.

Seren350

Serendipit-e, Inc. Communities and Tools for Active Learners
(launched 2000 in HTML, relaunched Typepad 2003)
Link: www.serendipit-e.com

Spinning350

Spinning and Being Spun: The idea of journalism in a postmodern age (launched 2005)
Link: www.serendipit-e.com/spinning

Weston350

Weston Productions News site (launched 2004, now dormant)
Link: www.serendipit-e.com/weston

Farmland_1

Hilltown Farmland Preservation: A Gathering Place for Information and Discussion about Farmland Preservation in Hilltown Township, Pennsylvania  (launched 2006)
Link: www.hilltownfarmlandpreservation.org

Bluestemthumb

A Bluestem Prairie: News from Minnesota's First Congressional District (launched 2006)
Link: www.bluestemprairie.com

Yorole

yo-role: couture and collectible hats and purses (in development 2006)

Susanmemorial350

Memorial blog for Dr. Susan Barnes (launched 2006)
Link: www.serendipit-e.com/drsusanbarnes

Whitehead350

Memorial blog for James Tillotson Whitehead (launched 2003)
Link: www.serendipit-e.com/whitehead

Consulting350

Serendipit-e, Inc. Research & Consulting Weblog (launched 2003)
Link: www.serendipit-e.com/consulting

Relativeblog350

Private Family Scrapbook Blog (launched 2003)

September 23, 2006 in Web Design | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Resume'

CHRIS BOESE

LinkedIn Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/chrisboese
Professional Portfolio: www.serendipit-e.com/boeseportfolio
Personal/Professional Weblog: www.serendipit-e.com/blog

Experienced Interaction Designer and Community Manager offering:

  • Proven interactive media production and marketing skills honed since the birth of the Web in 1993.
  • Experienced blog designer, author, and community manager. My serendipit-e.com domain of 28 individual and group blogs (12 are my personal blogs) currently ranks 42,000 on Technorati.com. One private listserv I manage has been in existence more than 5 years.
  • Web 2.0 technology research into social media and the grassroots citizen media movement, including a detailed method on how to integrate blogs and interactivity into PR, marketing, and workplace cultures.
  • An enthusiastic speaking and leadership style that motivates and inspires collaborative groups to exceed project goals and creatively push beyond existing limits.
  • An adept multi-tasker and quick learner, able to facilitate projects through rapid prototyping and thorough usability testing.
  • Advanced writing and communication skills, adaptable to short and long form media genres and a wide range of publishing venues, from technical writing to journalism and PR, blogs, and literary and scholarly journals.

RELEVANT EXPERIENCE

Writer; Researcher/Associate Writer: (Aug 2001 to present) CNN Headline News, Atlanta, GA.
Started one month before 9/11 and wrote the on-screen headline ticker from 2001-2003, through some of the most incredible breaking news in history. Cyberculture/cult media columnist for HLN on CNN.com: "Buzz Factor" and "Hot Wired." Freelance writer, CNN's "Anderson Cooper 360.” Developed RSS feed/intranet HLN blog on spec, 2003. Successfully completed copy editor training, 2005.

T. Anthony Pollner Distinguished Professor: (Fall Semester 2005) University of Montana School of Journalism, Missoula, MT.  Took leave from CNN Headline News for a one-semester endowed visiting professorship, teaching a seminar on weblogs and citizen journalism. Co-advisor to student newspaper for RSS-based redesign of its online edition. 300+ attended public lecture delivered for the endowment.

Assistant Professor: (1998-2002) Department of English, MA Professional Communication Program (MAPC), Clemson University, Clemson, SC.  In addition to teaching and research, received a grant to create and direct the PSA Interactive Resources Studio for Clemson Public Service Activities (1998-2001). Implemented a redesign of the PSA web site portal and about a dozen PSA client sites with 4 grad assistants and 2 student programmers. Approximately $100,000 funded over 3 years. nutball.com/archive/psaportal/ie/index.htm

Web/Computer Contractor/Consultant: Sample Clients: (1998) Cisco Systems, Albany, NY branch. Created database for the NYS government contract to access through a local node of the Cisco Intranet. (July 1995) UNISYS Transportation Sector Marketing Group, Bluebell, PA.

Design & Marketing Assistant: (1997-98) Rensselaer Office of Continuing & Distance Education. Handled design & production for all print and Web publications.

Graphic Designer: (1996-97) Lighting Research Center, School of Architecture. Rensselaer Polytechnic. DTP for research publications & large posters. Technical schematics, photo-editing, illustration. Poster designs won Society of Technical Communication award.

Marketing & Recruitment Grad Assistant: (1995-96) Electronic Media, Arts, & Communication (new program). Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. EMAC inaugural web site received Best of RPInfo award, 1996. Won the Rensselaer Founder's Award (highest award given at RPI) for work with EMAC.

EDUCATION

Ph.D. Rhetoric & [Technical] Communication: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, 1998. GPA 4.0. The first “born digital” (no paper) webbed dissertation (cyberculture ethnography) in the U.S. Permanent site is required in graduate seminars both within & outside the USA. Interviewed in New York Times article on cult TV. www.nutball.com/dissertation

Master of Fine Arts, Creative Writing, Poetry: University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, 1990.

Bachelor of Arts: University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire, 1985. Major: Journalism. Minor: English.

TECHNICAL SKILLS

CSS/HTML/XML   |   All Major Blog Platforms  |    Photoshop/Illustrator
Quark/Framemaker    |    InDesign/Dreamweaver  |    Flash/Director
iNews/Final Draft/Final Cut Pro    |    UNIX/PHP/MySQL 

PROFESSIONAL REFERENCES available upon request.

A complete portfolio of my work, including project URLS, is at www.serendipit-e.com/boeseportfolio.

Academic credentials and references available from Interfolio.com upon request.

September 23, 2006 in Resume | Permalink | TrackBack

September 22, 2006

Montana Journalism Review: Ethical issues between blogging and journalism

I just heard a terrific NPR "All Things Considered" piece on George Orwell's "Politics and the English Language," and since that essay and Orwell's other writings influenced my piece in the Summer 2006 Montana Journalism Review below, it seemed like a good time to post this up here. The odd numbers floating in the text are references to the Endnotes at the very end of the document.

Here's the full bib citation:

Boese, C. (2006) "Challenging the Power Structure." Montana Journalism Review. Summer 2006, Number 35. pp. 8-10.

 

Challenging the Power Structure

During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act. George Orwell

By Christine Boese

Picture the prototypical American "town square," the idealistic vision of Jeffersonian democracy: gathering places that people used to pass through almost every day, places that were the center of community life. Announcements and ideas were disseminated in these spaces. Anyone could set up a soapbox and start talking, although, as Clem Work has found in his research into the enforcement of the Alien and Sedition Act in Missoula in the early 20th century, there were very real attempts to squelch certain kinds of talk in some public squares.

Where do people gather to participate in their communities now? Aside from street festivals and parades, the few civic gatherings that remain take place in restricted or private spaces, in schools, churches, shopping malls, sports arenas. We have protections in the Constitution not only for speech, but also for the right to assemble. Activists of many stripes are bemoaning the loss of the true "commons," spaces that are set aside as the public domain, shared spaces that belong to all.

Journalists often have an explicit goal to cover community activities, and as such, they monitor and report on what happens in the "commons." But as the commons disappear, more often than not, journalists seek entry into the private spaces where decisions that affect communities are made. One unintended result of this shift is that journalists focus less on their communities and instead become willing satellites circling a class of power brokers, somewhat like the courtiers during Shakespeare's time.

A journalist has an ethical obligation to go where people are exercising their right to assemble, to monitor and cover the community, even if that community is a "global village." While face-to-face commons are disappearing, there still are places where people gather, discussing the events that affect their lives, participating in democracy in a most direct way.

And in the online "blogosphere," people are gathering. They're writing and editing their own customized interactive "newspapers" with headline readers and research they've done on their own, weighing and analyzing, making up their own minds instead of letting some editor they never voted for in the employ of some mass media conglomerate tell them what to think.

While the term "blog" was accepted into the Merriam Webster dictionary in 2004,1 few people profess to know very much about weblogs or the blog movement. If they do have an impression, it's often of self-obsessed teenagers putting too much private information online, or of anonymous and irresponsible talk radio-style ranting of the far right and left.

The problem is that blog software and the blog movement are two very different things. Blog software is a tool that can be used for a wide range of purposes. The "blog movement" is a social phenomenon having a very real impact at this moment in history.

The vast majority of what's being put online using blog software has very little to do with the "blog movement" per se. There are cooking recipe group blogs. About.com was converted to blog software several years ago. The University of Minnesota library is giving students blog space for learning, a project called UThink.2 Harvard Law School is using blogs to supplement teaching and discussions on legal issues.3 I have a poetry blog, my own idiosyncratic Norton Anthology, if you will.4

I often tell people that blog software is a poor person's content management system. It's like an empty coffee cup. What you pour into the cup is only bound by the limits of your imagination.

The database behind blog software is a terrific tool to hold all kinds of information for collaborative interactive access. I believe blog software will gobble up the entire Web because of the power of syndication (RSS) and headline feed readers.5

The "blog movement" is another thing altogether, and it's having considerable impact on journalism and journalistic ethics.

What the blog movement really does is reclaim the public commons for something that could approximate participatory democracy. Bloggers are having an impact on politics in the United States, most prominently at the national level. Increasingly, with grassroots political organizing, a tool called "Meetups,"6 and citizen journalism, their impact is also beginning to be felt at state and local levels.

Why would journalists be leery of the blog movement? Perhaps its massive size 7 and cacophony of voices are off-putting. Unlike with the public square, interactive online spaces place no limits on the number of soapboxes, and interfaces make rude "interruptions" impossible. Headline feed readers assist in the sorting and editing process, and other evolving features online let readers know where the crowds are gathering in the commons, and what ideas are being discussed there.8 In that respect, the movement of crowds online resembles a political caucus, where participants vote with their feet.

A journalist wouldn't expect every participant at a public hearing to be credible and quotable, but most often I hear journalists dismissing blogs because all bloggers aren't credible or reliable sources. Why should they be? Would a journalist give prominence to and quote any person on the street, even the drunk that comes stumbling out of a bar?

This electronic commons is also a hybrid, because it's a publishing space as well as a social space, and that gives a different kind of dialogic voice to the movement. While one person at a public hearing may have a nutty reason for opposing a particular change in the city law, that person didn't used to have the power to publish that opinion and distribute it widely.

And that brings us to the most crucial issue between journalists and bloggers: power.

The folks who asked me to write this article probably expected me to discuss blogging codes of ethics like the excellent one found at cyberjournalist.net,9 or the "pledge" citizen journalists had to take at Dan Gillmor's now failed "Bayosphere" project.10

Or perhaps they wanted me to discuss the common complaint made by bloggers against mainstream media, that traditional media methods are too cloaked in a black box and could be ethically suspect, so members of the blogging community often advocate for holding themselves to higher standards of ethical transparency than the mainstream press currently follows.

Those are all important issues because they deal with accountability and corruption, but the reason they are concerned with accountability and corruption is power. Power corrupts. If social and political power were not in play in the day-to-day workings of the mainstream press AND the blogosphere, none of this would be an issue. Until now, mainstream media has been a fairly exclusive gatekeeper to those who hold power.

Journalists approach power brokers in exclusive places on behalf of their readers/listeners/viewers. They must work with their feet in two worlds: the world of the power brokers, and the world of the ordinary people they serve. Corruption and serious ethical lapses in journalism usually happen when a power broker convinces a journalist to use the power of communication in service of the broker instead of the people. Journalists can be targets of such seductions just as surely as politicians can, because they sit at choke points of power, the power of the filter that says, "This gets published this way," and "this doesn't get published at all." There are people who would like to influence that filter for their own benefit. A journalist may even see a way to personally benefit by influencing the filter.

And so long as the world determined and defined by that set of filters is the only game in town, that world rules.

But then along come the bloggers. The blog movement has risen up in open rebellion against the common practices of mainstream media in a self-appointed role as a check and balance against a non-elected, non-governmental entity that nonetheless wields great power. One major sector of the blogosphere devotes itself entirely to media criticism.

Why should bloggers have any power over huge media entities? Why should words disseminated over cyberspace, the words of millions of bloggers, amount to anything except a rising chorus of babble? If ethics are about how one uses power responsibly according to a set of values based on something other than personal gain, would bloggers need ethics if they had no real power?

A peculiar thing is happening to ordinary people in the United States. They may be participating in the public commons in cyberspace on their own time, but their employers are becoming interested in monitoring what they have to say. Unlike when you speak words into the air, words uttered in cyberspace live forever in the ethers, in Google's long memory. And some people who have signed their names to their words online are losing their jobs over what they have written.

Generally, one would assume the First Amendment right to free speech and freedom to assemble would cover a person in such instances. However, employers who would restrict or monitor employee speech acts in cyberspace could seemingly respond, "Why of course you have freedom of speech. You are free to speak all you want, just as you also are free to not work here."

Bloggers, dissenting radio stations with significant audiences but few advertisers, and divergent voices can be seen as a threat by powerful people who are willing to use their power to restrict such voices. Perhaps that's because, as the writers of the U.S. Constitution understood, speech itself is powerful, simply the power of a voice speaking its truth. The kings and lords of our world amass power and wealth at levels that are hard to imagine, yet it appears some of them tremble in the face of free and dissenting speech.

What, then, is the most ethical act a person can engage in right now? What would that radical pamphleteer Thomas Paine have done? Many journalists decry the fact that a number of bloggers are not using their real names and instead adopt pseudonyms on their sites. This, they say, is a lapse in ethics and it undermines the credibility of these sites.

Bloggers, on the other hand, have to find a way to keep a steady paycheck while speaking their truths to power. Free speech uttered while warming one's hands over a barrel fire under a bridge has very little communicative reach. Anonymity may breed irresponsibility and possibly risk libel, but which ethical value is higher, getting the story out, or putting it away to never see the light of day because the price of putting your name on it is too high?

Think of what our world would be like if the words of many pseudonymous writers in our past had never reached us, including that war correspondent and socialist Eric Blair, an advocate for clear and concrete writing and against the political use of language to deliberately lie and obfuscate. He did that all the while lying about his own identity and hiding behind the fake name of George Orwell.


Endnotes

1 "'Blog' Is Runaway Word Of Year." Associated Press story at CBS News Dec.1 2004. Retrieved 3/11/06 at http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2004/12/01/print/main658433.shtml.

2 "Uthink: Blogs at the University Libraries." University of Minnesota Libraries. Retrieved 3/11/06 at http://blog.lib.umn.edu/.

3 "Weblogs at Harvard Law." Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Law. Retrieved 3/11/06 at http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/.

4 Boese, C. Ed. (2006) "Headpiece Filled with Straw." Retrieved 3/12/06 at http://www.serendipit-e.com/hollow.

5 I recommend starting at Bloglines.com or FeedDemon.com to try out some of the most user-friendly headline feed readers.

6 Meetup: World's largest community of local Meetups, clubs, and groups!" Retrieved 3/14/06 at http://www.meetup.com.

7 At last count, Technorati.com says it is monitoring 30.5 million blogs (3/14/06).

8 Technorati.com is one of the most popular tools for finding out where the action is in the blogosphere on any given day. Other suitable sites are the Daypop Top 40 at Daypop.com and Blogpulse.com.

9 "A Blogger's Code of Ethics." Cyberjournalist.net. Retrieved 3/11/06 at http://www.cyberjournalist.net/news/000215.php.

10 "Bayosphere Citizen Journalist Pledge." Bayosphere. Retrieved 3/11/06 at http://bayosphere.com/cjregister.

September 22, 2006 in Published Research, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

September 01, 2006

Academic Vita

CHRISTINE BOESE
www.serendipit-e.com/boeseportfolio

EDUCATION

Ph.D. Rhetoric and Communication: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, 1998. GPA 4.0. Dissertation Chair: David Porush. Readers: James Zappen, Tamar Gordon, Audrey Steinhauer. Outside Reader: Cynthia Selfe.

Dissertation: The Ballad of the Internet Nutball. www.nutball.com/dissertation
Online ethnography & rhetorical analysis was first Web-based hypertext dissertation accepted at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, in 1998. Since then the permanent site has received international recognition and is required reading in graduate seminars both within & outside the USA, receiving international trAce award (UK), Dec 2000. Author interviewed in New York Times article on cult TV in 2000. Research was subject of a visual rhetoric study by Mary E. Hocks in June 2003 issue of the Journal of College Composition and Communication.

Master of Fine Arts, Creative Writing, Poetry: University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, 1990 (sixty credit terminal degree). Thesis: Darkroom Glories poetry manuscript.

Bachelor of Arts: University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire, 1985.
Major: Journalism. Minor: English.


SPECIALTIES, RESEARCH & TEACHING INTERESTS

Weblogs & Micropublishing, Cyberculture & VR, Social Network Computing, Interface Design & Usability, Interaction Design, Hypermedia & Multimedia Communication Theory, Visual Communication, Graphic Design, Computers & Composition, Rhetorical Theory and Analysis, Feminist Theory, Cultural Studies, Ethnographic Research Methods, Professional/Technical Communication, Electronic Journalism, Public Relations, Literary Journalism, Photojournalism, Poetry, Nonfiction, & Fiction Workshops


TECHNICAL SKILLS


Proficiency (able to teach): Movable Type, TypePad, Avstar & iNews; Director, Flash, & Dreamweaver; Photoshop; Illustrator & Freehand; PageMaker & Quark; Excel; FileMaker Pro; HTML & CSS.
Basic Knowledge: UNIX, JavaScript, XHTML, XML, MySQL, PHP

EMPLOYMENT: Weblogs, Journalism, Photojournalism, Graphic Design

T. Anthony Pollner Distinguished Professor: On leave from CNN Headline News to teach endowed one-semester visiting position for Fall 2005 at University of Montana School of Journalism, Missoula, MT. Seminar on weblogs and citizen journalism, Co-advisor to student newspaper and assisted with RSS-based redesign of its online edition.

Writer; Researcher/Associate Writer: CNN Headline News, Atlanta, GA (Aug 2001 to present). Writer on evening and afternoon prime time shows. Wrote & edited on-screen 2-deck headline “ticker” live during major events in recent history, including 9/11 and 2 wars. Cyberculture/cult media columnist for HLN on CNN.com: "BuzzFactor" and "Hot Wired." Freelanced for CNN's Anderson Cooper 360 NYC prime time show.

Design and Marketing Assistant: RSVP: Office of Continuing and Distance Education, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. (1997-98) Web redesign, desktop publishing, and marketing displays.

Graphic Designer: Lighting Research Center, School of Architecture, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. (Spring 1997, 1996)

News Photographer: Northwest Arkansas Times (daily circ. 13,000) Fayetteville, AR. Thomson chain. (1989)

Design and Production Intern: University of Arkansas Press, Fayetteville, AR. (1989) Assisted national award-winning book designers.

Freelance Photography, DTP, and Multimedia Business: (1987 to present) University of Arkansas Theater and NCAA Division I Sports in 1980s; freelance photojournalism, stock photography and weddings in 1990s. Expanded into graphic design, digital imaging, public relations writing, and web design in the 2000s.

Photographer II (Dept. Manager): Photo Services, Division of Information, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. (1986-88)

Contract Reporter and Photographer: Oak Leaves (weekly), Fayetteville, AR. (1985-86)

Reporter, Photographer, Darkroom Production: Frontiersman and Valley Sun newspapers (biweekly), Wasilla, Alaska. (Summer 1985, 1977-80).

Reporter and Photographer: News and Publications, University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire. (1984-85)

 

EMPLOYMENT: Academic

Courses Taught
Seminar on Weblogs & Citizen Journalism*, Visual Communication Graduate Seminar, Rhetoric of Web Publishing Graduate Seminar*, Writing for Electronic Media*, Technical Writing, Laptop Composition, Honors Composition, Expository Writing (pilot course for computer-assisted teaching), Writing for Electronic Media* (RPI iteration), Writing to the World Wide Web*, Newswriting, Reporting, Feature Writing, Photojournalism. GT Critical Thinking & Creative Writing (* indicates new courses I developed).

T. Anthony Pollner Distinguished Professor: On leave from CNN Headline News to teach endowed one-semester visiting position for Fall 2005 at University of Montana School of Journalism, Missoula, MT. Seminar on weblogs and citizen journalism, Co-advisor to student newspaper and assisted with RSS-based redesign of its online edition.

Assistant Professor: Department of English, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (1998 to 2002). Visual Communication Seminar, Professional Communication, New Media and Web Design, Interaction Architecture and Usability, Pilot Laptop Program.

Administrative Assistant:
Electronic Media, Arts, and Communication (EMAC Program). Language, Literature and Communication, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. (1996-97) Marketing and Recruitment.

Teaching Assistant: Language, Literature and Communication, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. (1994-96) Courses: Expository Writing (pilot course for computer-assisted teaching), Writing for Electronic Media, Writing to the World Wide Web (new courses I developed), computer workshops for faculty.

Research Assistant: Language, Literature and Communication, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY. (Fall 1993) NSF-funded Design Conference Room for Computer-Supported Collaborative Work.

Tenure-Track Instructor: Valdosta State University, English (Journalism) Valdosta, Georgia. (Sept. 1990 to June 1993) Courses: Newswriting, Reporting, Feature Writing, Photojournalism, Photo Editing, Honors Composition, and First Year Composition.

Creative Writing Teacher: Young Writer’s Workshop, SCOPE, Public Services, Valdosta State University. (Jan. to March 1992, 1991)

Teacher, Critical Thinking, Fiction Writing: Arkansas Governor’s School, top state-funded HS gifted program in Arkansas. (June-July, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1990)

Graduate Assistant: University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, English. (Sept. 1988 to May 1990) Courses: First Year Composition, 2-semester sequence.

Creative Writing Teacher, PR Officer, Photographer: Project Wet and Wild (state-funded summer nature camp for gifted and talented high school students) Rogers, AR. (Aug. 1987, 1988, 1989)


EMPLOYMENT: Research, Consulting, & Contract Work

CNN Headline News Seminars Knowledge Log: (2003) K-log built on spec for editorial staff intranet support for a series of writing seminars, script workshops, & discussion on style guides. Approved for full implementation & funding, Sept. 2003, but later discontinued. Resurrected for newsgroup-wide employee intranet prototype, Sept. 2006.

Companion Web Site: Technical Communication, 9th ed. John M. Lannon, Longman. Content development, hypertextual structuring, student guide.

Corporate Advisory Board, Software Secure: Boston, MA. Online essay testing software for laptop programs and electronic classrooms. Appointed 2000.

Sponsored Research, Web Consultant, Director, PSA Interactive Resources Studio: (1998 to 2001) Clemson University Public Service Activities. Created interface research and testing division with 4 graduate assistants and 1 undergraduate programmer. Built multimedia studio. Planned and implemented redesign of the PSA web site to test interface design theory. Directed team of web consultant RAs for stakeholders under the land grant university’s public service commitment. Studio teaching of graduate and undergraduate students in interaction architecture and web consulting. About $100,000 funded over 3 years.

Computer Consultant: Cisco Systems, Albany, NY branch. (1997) Created Excel database for the NYS government contract, then planned and designed a local node of the Cisco Web behind a firewall for NYS contract price list, demo inventory, and promotions. Set up a web server.

Web Consultant: Seminar / Site Workshop for the UNISYS Transportation Sector Marketing Group, Bluebell, PA. (July 1995) 1-day seminar to help TMSG overhaul web site for graphical competitiveness, nonlinear design, and high-end functionality. Prepared formal recommendations after session.

Computer Consultant: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Language Literature and Communication, Troy, NY. (1994-95) Conducted faculty workshops, provided professors with software assistance, managed department Unix space.

AWARDS: General

Service Learning Mini-Grant, Clemson University, Fall 1999, $500.

Collaborative Learning Environment Faculty Fellow. Clemson University, Summer 1999, $5,000.

Sponsored Research, Clemson University Public Service Activities Interactive Resources Studio. Clemson University Public Service Activities. Course buy-out funding of $9620 annually, funding for 4 graduate assistants annually $28,000, one time funding for the building of a multimedia studio, $20,000. About $100,000 funded over 3 years.

1996 Rensselaer Founders’ Award of Excellence. 1 of 5 in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences; highest award given at Rensselaer for academic excellence, creativity, discovery, leadership and service.

Master Teaching Fellow, Rensselaer, 1995-96. One of 6 graduate assistants honored for outstanding teaching Institute-wide.


AWARDS: Writing & Speaking

McKinney Award, second place, graduate electronic multimedia, “Résumé Projector,” Rensselaer, 1997.

McKinney Award, second place, graduate poetry, “Springtime in Upstate New York,” Rensselaer, 1996.

McKinney Awards, second place, graduate fiction, “Finding Bodies;” second place, graduate poetry, “Midwest Hometown,” Rensselaer, 1995.

McKinney Awards, third place, graduate nonfiction, “Project Wet and Wild;” second place, graduate poetry, “Darkroom Glories,” Rensselaer, 1994.

M. Blair Hart Award, nonfiction, “Project Wet and Wild,” University of Arkansas Press, 1990.

Felix McKeon Award, poetry, “Darkroom Glories,” University of Arkansas English Department, 1990.

Lily Peter Fellowship, runner-up, poetry, “Juggling,” University of Arkansas English Department, 1988.

Third Place Persuasive Speaking; Third Place in Dramatic Interpretation, and Fourth Place in After Dinner Speaking at Novice Nationals, Omaha, NE, 1982. Seven additional awards for Persuasive Speaking, After Dinner Speaking, and Prose Interpretation while on UWEC Speech Team 1981-83. Qualified for NFA and AFA Nationals in 1982 and 1983.


AWARDS: Photography & Design

Lighting Research Center Partner's Day Posters, Award of Achievement, Society for Technical Communication, 1996 Publications Competition.

EMAC Web Site named “Best of RPInfo, January 1996.

Arthur L. Murray Scholarship for outstanding contributions to a campus publication, The View alumni magazine, UWEC, 1985.

First place, color photography, Society of Professional Journalists-Sigma Delta Chi, UWEC, 1985.

AEJMC national competition, prospectus and sample issue for a magazine design project ranked in top ten, 1985.

Harry E. Polk Memorial Award for best-designed special page, second place, UWEC, 1984.


PUBLICATIONS: Chapters in (Peer-Reviewed) Edited Books

“The Virtual Locker Room in Classroom Electronic Chat Spaces: The Politics of Men as Other.” Feminist Cyberscapes: Mapping Gendered Academic Spaces. Pamela Takayoshi and Kristine Blair, eds. Ablex Publishers. 1999.

"Notes toward a "Reflective Instrumentalism": A Collaborative Look at Clemson University's MAPC Program." Authors: Christine Boese, Mark Charney, Beth Daniel, Barbara Hefferon, Susan Hilligoss, Tharon Howard, Martin Jacobi, Bernadette Longo, Carl Lovitt, Sean Williams, Kathleen Blake Yancey, and Art Young. In Innovative Approaches to the Teaching of Technical Communication. Tracy Bridgeford, Karla Saari Kitalong, Dickie Selfe eds. Utah State Press. 2003.


PUBLICATIONS: Peer-Reviewed Electronic Collection

"The Spirit of Paulo Freire in Klogland: Struggling for a Knowledge-Log Revolution" Into the Blogosphere: Rhetoric, Community, and Culture of Weblogs, peer-reviewed collection edited by the University of Minnesota Blog Collective. 2004. http://blog.lib.umn.edu/blogosphere/


PUBLICATIONS: Peer-Reviewed Conference Proceedings

“Making a Successful Case for a Hypertextual Doctoral Dissertation.” ACM 2000 Hypertext: Proceedings of the Eleventh ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia May 30  – June 4, 2000 San Antonio, Texas, USA. New York: Association for Computing Machinery, 2000. 232-233.


PUBLICATIONS: Non-Peer-reviewed Professional Journal

"Challenging the Power Structure: Ethical issues between blogging and journalism." Montana Journalism Review. University of Montana School of Journalism. Summer 2006, Number 35. pp. 8-10.

PUBLICATIONS: Non-Peer-reviewed Book Section

Prologue of the book "OJO, ver desde Irak", by Carolina Podesta. Editado por Distal, 2003. Argentinian book based on Carolina Podesta's Iraq war weblog. English version available at http://www.carolinapodesta.com/prologo_ingles.htm.


PUBLICATIONS: Online Articles

“The Internet imagined: 'We are immigrants to the future”: CNN Headline News web site, “Buzz Factor” column. Jan 26, 2005. www.cnn.com/2005/TECH/01/26/internet.future/index.html.

“Tsunami relief effort may break new ground in fund raising”: CNN Headline News web site, “Hot Wired” column. Jan 19, 2005. www.cnn.com/2005/TECH/01/19/web.tsunami.aid/index.html

“Passport chips raise privacy concerns”: CNN Headline News web site, “Buzz Factor” column. Jan 6, 2005. www.cnn.com/2005/TECH/01/06/passports/index.html

“Invasion of the podcasting people?”: CNN Headline News web site, “Buzz Factor” column. Dec 8, 2004. www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/12/08/podcasting/index.html

“Imagining the future of the Internet”: CNN Headline News web site, “Buzz Factor” column. Nov 10, 2004. www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/11/10/internet.future/index.html

"Can you prove you're not a machine?"; CNN Headline News web site, "Buzz Factor" column. Oct 13, 2004. www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/10/13/turing.test/index.html

"Will cyber journalists turn the tables on big media?"; CNN Headline News web site, "Buzz Factor" column. Sep 15, 2004. www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/09/15/cyber.journalist/index.html

"Surviving crashes: A cautionary tale"; CNN Headline News web site, "Hot Wired" column. July 29, 2004. www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/07/29/back.it.up/index.html.

"Next generation of stun guns"; CNN Headline News web site, "Hot Wired" column. June 23, 2004. www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/06/23/new.stun.guns/index.html.

"There once was a woman who lived in her computer"; CNN Headline News web site, "BuzzFactor" column. June 21, 2004. www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/06/21/smart.home/index.html.

"Plug obsession"; CNN Headline News web site, "Hot Wired" column. May 19, 2004. www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/05/19/plugs/index.html.

"Revenge of the 'Big Ears'"; CNN Headline News web site, "BuzzFactor" column. May 3, 2004. www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/05/03/big.ears/index.html.

"Chipping away at privacy with radio waves"; CNN Headline News web site, "Hot Wired" column. April 21, 2004. www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/04/21/rfid/index.html.

"This is your brain on silicon. Any questions?"; CNN Headline News web site, "BuzzFactor" column. January 26, 2004. www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/01/26/hln.hot.buzz.silicon.brain/index.html.

"You've got a friend... of a friend... of a friend"; CNN Headline News web site, "BuzzFactor" column. December 8, 2003. www.cnn.com/2003/SHOWBIZ/12/05/hln.hot.buzz.foaf.networks/index.html.

"The metaphysics of spam"; CNN Headline News web site, "BuzzFactor" column. October 20, 2003. www.cnn.com/2003/SHOWBIZ/10/20/hln.hot.buzz.spam/index.html.

"Internet newbies unite.” CNN Headline News web site, "BuzzFactor" column. Sept 3, 2003. www.cnn.com/2003/TECH/09/01/hln.hot.buzz.weblogs/index.html.

"Welcome to the ‘new’ Web, same as the ‘old’ Web.” CNN Headline News web site, "BuzzFactor" column. July 15, 2003. www.cnn.com/2003/TECH/07/14/hln.hot.buzz.new.web/index.html.

"Living like a 'Modern Nomad'." CNN Headline News web site, "BuzzFactor" column. April 22, 2003. www.cnn.com/2003/SHOWBIZ/04/18/hln.hot.buzz.modern.nomad2/index.html.

"Are you a Modern Nomad?" CNN Headline News web site, "BuzzFactor" column. March 14, 2003. www.cnn.com/2003/SHOWBIZ/03/14/hln.hot.buzz.modern.nomad/index.html.

"Fans speak up on NeoPets." CNN Headline News web site, "BuzzFactor" column. February 10, 2003. www.cnn.com/2003/SHOWBIZ/02/10/hln.hot.buzz.neopet/index.html.

"NeoPets invade the Internet world." CNN Headline News web site, "BuzzFactor" column. January 6, 2003. www.cnn.com/2003/SHOWBIZ/01/06/hln.hot.buzz.neopets/index.html.

"The karma of virtual libraries." CNN Headline News web site, "BuzzFactor" column. November 28, 2002. www.cnn.com/2002/SHOWBIZ/11/28/hln.hot.buzz.virtual.libraries/index.html.

"DragonCon: All hope abandon, ye who enter here." CNN Headline News web site, "BuzzFactor" popular culture column, "BuzzFactor." August 19, 2002. www.cnn.com/2002/US/08/16/hln.hot.buzz.dragon/index.html

"The Convention as Authentic Xena Experience: A Postmodern Dialogue by an Avatar and Nomad." Co-authored with Dr. Carolyn Bremer. Whoosh! online Xena fanzine, sponsored by the International Association for Xena Studies (IAXS). June 2001. www.whoosh.org/issue57/bremer57.html#it.

“Don’t Forget About Della: Standing the Test of Time.” Whoosh! online Xena fanzine, sponsored by the International Association for Xena Studies (IAXS). June 2000. whoosh.org

“Spinning off from the Source: Alternative Fan Fiction Changes with the Seasons.” Whoosh! online Xena fanzine, sponsored by the International Association for Xena Studies (IAXS). October 1998. http://whoosh.org

“Going into the Woods.” Computer-Mediated Communication Magazine, December 1996. www.december.com/cmc/mag/dec/toc.html

“An Immodest Proposal.” Computer-Mediated Communication Magazine, April 1995. www.december.com/cmc/mag/april/toc.html

PUBLICATIONS: Poems

“Garnett and Judy, Tea and Cobbler, Free Cuisenart, Spring 1997.
“Memory, Moon,” Habersham Review, Spring 1996.
“Boomtown Winter,” Habersham Review, Spring 1996.
“Juggling,” Snake Nation Review, Spring 1993.
“Rival,” Santa Clara Review, Spring 1993.
“Be Easy,” Santa Clara Review, Spring 1993.
“Alumni Game,” Santa Clara Review, Fall 1992.
“Intimate with Owls,” Caesura, Spring 1991.
“Found Poem—Freshman Essay,” Kentucky Poetry Review, Fall 1991.
“Alone,” Painted Hills Review, Fall 1991.
“Statement,” Pendragon, Spring 1992.
“Aliens,” Pendragon, Spring 1992.
“Wine Bottle,” NOTA, 1984.
“Freedom,” NOTA, 1984.


PUBLICATIONS: Online Textbook Content

Companion Web Site: Technical Communication, 9th ed. John M. Lannon, Longman. Content development, hypertextual structuring, student guide. Fall 2002.


PUBLICATIONS: Photography & Design

Front Page Lead Photo, Lead Web site Photo, “Clemson seniors help save woman from drowning.” The Greenville News. April 11, 2000.

Book Cover Design and Photography, Lucifer Rising by Sharon Bowers, Justice House Publishers/Lightning/Ingram, 1999.

“The Approach in 1995,” published with “Rhetorician as Agent of Social Change” by Ellen Cushman in College Composition and Communication,
vol. 47, No. 1, February 1996.

Frontispiece portrait, John December, World Wide Web Unleashed, SAMS Publishing/Macmillan, October 1994.

Book jacket portrait, James Whitehead, Near at Hand, University of Missouri Press, Spring 1993.

Book jacket portrait, Heather Ross Miller, Friends and Assassins, University
of Missouri Press, Spring 1993. Hard Evidence, University of Missouri Press, 1991.

Book jacket portrait, James Whitehead, Joiner, University of Arkansas Press reprint series, 1991.


PRESENTATIONS: Conferences

"The Spirit of Paulo Freire in Klogland: Struggling for a Knowledge-Log Revolution;" from conference-themed panel on "Borderland Technologies as Catalysts for Communication and Deliberation: Blogs, Klogs, and Gripe sites" presented at International Communication Association Conference, San Diego, May 27, 2003.

“Taking Problem-based Service Learning to the Internet: Where is Everybody and What can We Do About It?” from a panel developed on “Technology Access and Activist Pedagogies: Finding the Dialogues in New Media” presented at The Thomas R. Watson Conference on Rhetoric and Composition, Louisville, KY, October 5-7, 2000.

“Comparing Interface Features between Text-based and Graphical Chat Environments,” at a panel with a PSA Interactive Resources Studio student researcher on “Enhancing the Visual in Synchronous Chat Interfaces: How Do Graphical Environments Affect Collaborative Cultures?” IEEE Professional Communication Society (IPCC)/ACM SIGDOC conference on Teamwork and Technology, Cambridge, MA, September 24-27, 2000.

“Issues in Hypertext Publishing.” Eleventh ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia, Invited Panelist with Mark Bernstein, Stuart Moulthrop, and Scott McCloud (keynote speaker), San Antonio, TX, May 30-June 4, 2000.

“Making a Successful Case for a Hypertextual Doctoral Dissertation.” Eleventh ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia, Peer Reviewed Short Paper, San Antonio, TX, May 30-June 4, 2000.

"Adventures in Alternative Hypertext Structuring: Research, Professional, and Classroom Uses," Eleventh ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia, Poster Session,  San Antonio, TX, May 30-June 4, 2000.

"Writing Without Teachers: Radical Pedagogy Meets Cyberculture in the Online Xenaverse." Computers and Writing 2000, Fort Worth, TX, May 26-28.

"Adventures in Alternative Hypertext Structuring: Research, Professional, and Classroom Uses," Poster Session, Computers and Writing 2000, Fort Worth, TX, May 26-28.

“The Xenaverse in Cyberspace: How a Web Culture Influenced a Warrior Princess.” 1999 Computers and Writing, Rapid City, SC, May 28-30.

“Toward a Rhetoric of Polemic for Cyberspace: Ethos, Interaction, and Incommensurability on the World Wide Web.” 1998 Conference on College Composition and Communication, Chicago, IL.

“Copia Verborum with a Multiplicity of Voices: Classical Imitation Can Privilege a Variety of Nondominant Discourses.” 1996 Rhetorical Society of America Conference, Tucson, AZ.

Rhetorical Approaches to Synchronous Chat Texts: Snapshots of Evolving Cultures.” 1996 Conference on College Composition and Communication, Milwaukee, WI.

“Town-Gown Conflicts Writ Large: The Rhetoric of the Religious Right Toward Arkansas Governor’s School.” Special Topics Session: Rhetorics of Disciplinary and Professional Authority, Penn State Conference on Rhetoric and Composition, July 1995, University Park, PA.

“The Virtual Locker Room: Gender and Democracy in Classroom Electronic Chat Spaces.” 1995 Conference on College Composition and Communication, Washington, DC.

“Strange Attractors in Illyria: Androgyny in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night,” Restructuring Our World: Second Annual Northwest Arkansas Women’s Festival and Conference, March 1991, Fayetteville, AR.


PRESENTATIONS: Lectures & Workshops

"Big Media & Little Bloggers: How Corporate Media Responded to Warblogging Journalists." Required public lecture presented for the T. Anthony Pollner endowment, Oct. 10, 2005, at the University Center Theater at the University of Montana, Missoula, through the School of Journalism.

"Big Media & Little Bloggers: How Corporate Media Responded to Warblogging Journalists." Invited speaker for the annual meeting of the Montana AP Broadcasters' Association meeting, Oct. 8, 2005, in Billings, Montana.

"Weblogs: The Spirit of Paulo Freire in Klogland." Invited talk for University of Minnesota School of Journalism New Media Research Breakfast, Minneapolis, MN, Sept. 10, 2003. Also met with a group of graduate students working on blog research projects.

"Classroom Sessions on the Anniversary of Sept 11, 2001. Invited to speak to 4 journalism and public relations classes at the University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire Dept of Communication and Journalism, Sept. 11, 2003. Topics: experiences covering a major disaster, anthrax scare, and 2 wars in 2 years; modular screen redesigns and onscreen text in cable network news; convergence in text-based, broadcast & interactive media; grassroots journalism in the blog movement.

"The Iraq War, Warblogs, & Mainstream Media,” Invited talk for University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire Dept of Communication and Journalism Society of Professional Journalists, Sigma Delta Chi meeting, Eau Claire, WI, Sept. 9, 2003.

“Designing Television News for a Younger Demographic.” Invited speaker for current events and honors journalism classes at Walker High School, Atlanta, GA, Aug. 24, 2003.

“Webbing Student Collaborative Writing Projects,” Georgia State University Writing Across the Curriculum faculty development workshop, Atlanta, GA, May 20, 2001.

“Innovative Assignments for Laptop and Online Pedagogies.” Presentation given at the inaugural faculty development workshop for the Arts, Architecture, and Humanities pilot laptop program, August 15, 2000.

“PSA Web Proposed Redesign,” formal presentations given to win launch approval for the Clemson PSA Web Site from various constituencies: the director of marketing and vice president for Public Service Activities (May 1999), the PSA Marketing Leadership Group (July 12, 1999), the PSA Directors (August 2, 1999), PSA Web Development Group (January 12, 2000), and the PSA Marketing Retreat (full marketing and publications staff attending) (October 7, 1999).

“Using Computer-Assisted Pedagogies with the CLE,” Collaborative Learning Environment (CLE) Faculty Fellow Presentation to the Teaching and Technology Faculty Institute, July 28, 1999.

“Faculty Experiences Using the CLE to Integrate Technology into the Curriculum.” Invited speaker for a 30-minute faculty development presentation, January 29, 1999.

“Interactivity and Extremism on the Internet: The Making and Courting of Dynamic, High Traffic Online Cultures,” presentation given at the Fall 1998 Pearce Center Corporate Board Meeting, Madren Center, Clemson University.

“Nonlinear Interactivity vs. Linear Media,” invited speaker at the “Capital Region Media Arts Festival and Competition,” Shenendehowa High School, April 1997.

“Chris-B” one of 14 selected participants in a multi-school Ph.D. colloquium, Fall 1994, on “Rhetoric, Community, and Cyberspace” held entirely in the text-based virtual environment of Diversity University MOO. Led by James P. Zappen, Laura J. Gurak, and Stephen Doheny-Farina, who published an article of the same title in Rhetoric Review 15 (1997): 400-19. (rpi.edu/~zappenj/Publications/Texts/rhetoric.html)

“Introduction to Multimedia and Hypermedia,” presentation given at the 1994 session of Arkansas Governor’s School.

“Media Vultures Go Home!” presentation on photojournalism and ethics given at the 1993 session of Arkansas Governor’s School.

Journalism Workshops at VSU: “Photo Enterprising.” Presentation for 96 high school students attending journalism seminars at Valdosta State.


ELECTRONIC WORK: Web & Interface Design

Weston Productions News Site: Emmy and Telly award-winning Alaskan photojournalist and his satellite-uplink TV and documentary filmmaking company. damon.typepad.com/weston.

Animated Flash intro and image map for book web site, The Curse of Cain, by J. Mark Powell and L.D. Meagher. Forge Books. 2005. www.thecurseofcain.com.

Memorial Blogs: James Tillotson Whitehead, 1936-2003 (www.serendipit-e.com/whitehead), Gordon W. Barton, 1935-2003 (www.serendipit-e.com/gordie). The first is a community site for students and friends who could not make the memorial service for the noted poet, novelist, and co-founder of the Arkansas Creative Writing MFA program. The second is a family memorial site, a place to grieve and to share memories and photos.

CNN Headline News Seminars Knowledge Log: (2003) K-log built on spec for editorial staff intranet support for a series of writing seminars, script workshops, & discussion on style guides. Approved for full implementation & funding, Sept. 2003, but later discontinued.

“The Other Side” and “OJO”: TIME correspondent Joshua Kucera’s Iraq warblog, “The Other Side,” was written up in The Boston Globe before TIME shut it down, and in The Wall Street Journal, Chicago Tribune, MSNBC.com afterward. “OJO,” Argentine journalist Carolina Podesta’s Spanish Iraq warblog was featured on Argentine TV. It later was the subject of a conference and developed into a print book. At the height of the war, both sites were generating 1,000+ unique US and international visitors per day. www.serendipit-e.com/otherside, www.serendipit-e.com/ojo.

"Getting Wet and Wild." Award-winning creative nonfiction essay converted to hypertext using experimental linking strategies and dialogic features developed on blog content management system with XML/RSS feeds. www.serendipit-e.com/wetwild

Researcher & Writer for 2001 redesign of CNN Headline News with convergent modular TV screen interface. Consulted on broadcast and web visual redesign for 1-yr anniversary of original redesign (Aug 2002). Cyberculture/cult media columnist, "Buzz Factor,” and “Hot Wired.” Headline News web site redesign surpassed 1 million hits/month, 9/02, 1 month after that redesign launched. Before redesign, avg. 1,500 hits a month (not involved in February 2005 redesign for new prime time programs, which has little editorial content, just promotional material, and gets very little traffic).

Public Service Activities at Clemson web portal, launched October 1999, with the PSA Interactive Resources Team. In first year after launch, site generated more hits and unique visitors than the Clemson University Home Page. Formal usability study to begin November 2000 to test interface design theory. Archive of tested site: nutball.com/archive/psaportal. Usability report available in PDF.

Trained & supervised graduate assistant web consultants designing about 20 independent PSA web sites such as South Carolina Botanical Garden, Garrison Arena, 4-H, Institute on Family and Neighborhood Life, and others. Several of these sites also generated more hits and unique visitors than the Clemson University Home Page in 2000. The graduate student responsible for the Garrison Arena site received a community service award from the City of Pendleton for the site’s positive impact on economic development in the area.

Be Heard! community service web site developed by students in laptop sections of English Composition at Clemson University. The site is directed toward low income and homeless people using free services online from public library terminals and freenets. The ongoing project seeks to directly address the widening gulf between technology haves and have-nots. www.nutball.com/beheard (Fall 1999-2000).

Clemson Palace Graphical Chat Environment, public forum and moderated chat space. Developed by Jeffrey Moreland, undergraduate honors student, in Directed Study and while working on assignment for PSA Interactive Research Studio. Papers on the interface design strategy presented at IPCC/SIGDOC 2000.

The Rhetoric of Web Publishing Course Web, graduate seminar at Clemson University, 1999, www.nutball.com/classes/webpub. (Fall 1999).

English 102 Laptop Web, a series of collaborative class webs integrating experimental nonlinear webbed student writing, www.serendipit-e.com/serendipite/2005/02/quickie_index_t.html. (Fall 1998-Spring 2002).

The Ballad of the Internet Nutball, online ethnography & rhetorical analysis was first Web-based hypertext dissertation accepted at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, in 1998. Since then the permanent site has received international recognition and is required reading in graduate seminars both within & outside the USA, receiving international trAce award (UK), Dec 2000. Author interviewed in New York Times article on cult TV in 2000. Research was subject of a visual rhetoric study by Mary E. Hocks in June 2003 issue of the Journal of College Composition and Communication.

RSVP Web, Continuing and Distance Education, redesign for marketing and coursework delivery. Site has since undergone several redesigns and the distance-learning program has been renamed. rsvp.rpi.edu (1998).

Cisco Albany-Web, Cisco Systems, secure site for sales, technical support, GE and NY State contract support (1997).

“Going into the Woods.” December 1996. creative hypermedia non-fiction essay in CMC Magazine. www.december.com/cmc/mag/dec/toc.html.

Electronic Media, Arts, and Communication program inaugural Site Designer, 1996-97. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Site won Best of RPInfo in 1996. emac.rpi.edu (Site has been redesigned, but original work is archived at www.nutball.com/archive).

ELECTRONIC WORK: Macromedia Director & Flash

Animated Flash intro and image map for book site, The Curse of Cain, by J. Mark Powell and L.D. Meagher. Forge Books. 2005. www.thecurseofcain.com.

APEX Design, Writing for Electronic Media course CD-ROM, 2000

Lost in Cyberspace, Writing for Electronic Media course CD-ROM, 1996

Juggling, An Interpretive Hyperpoem, Multimedia Résumé, Multimedia and Print Portfolio, CD-ROM 1998


ACTIVITIES: Service

Performed multiple roles in the 3-night sold-out run of the only production in South Carolina of Eve Ensler’s The Vagina Monologues, for V-Day at Clemson University, Feb 2001.

International Editorial Advisory Board, Intensities, the Journal of Cult Media. University of Wales, Cardiff. Interdisciplinary peer-reviewed e-journal, www.cult-media.com. Spring 2001.

Textbook Review and Testing, EasyWriter, St. Martin’s Press, 2000. Textbook Review and Testing, St. Martin’s Press, 1999.

Reviewer for World Communication Journal, special issue on Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) and Intercultural Processes, 1999.

Coordinator for presentations and showroom demonstrations of the Pilot Laptop Program on “Interdisciplinary Collaboration: Technology, Culture, and Community” for the Kellogg Regional Conference on Higher Education, held at Clemson University Madren Center October 8, 1998.

Web Designer and Member of the Research Team of the Pearce Center for Professional Communication, 1998.

Chair, Completed Master’s Thesis, Clemson University, Kati Beck, May 2002.

Chair, Completed Master’s Project, Clemson University, Julie Campbell, August 2001.

Committee member, completed Master’s Projects & Theses, Clemson University, John Williams, Jodi Fogle, Summer 1999. Aubrae Wagner, Fall 1999. Scott Speights, Spring 2000. Wendy Winn, Birma Gainor, Summer 2000. Jennifer Petroff, Fall 2000. Melissa Tidwell, Katy Goforth, Spring 2001.

Graduate Independent Study courses, Writing for High Bandwidth Multimedia, Dustin Annen, William Worzel, Spring/Summer 1999.

Directed Study Honors Pilot Project, Virtual Reality and Cyberculture: Creating the Clemson Palace, Jeffery Moreland, Fall 1999.

Service on Clemson English Department committees, Composition, Computer, Writing Major, MA in Professional Communication.

Member of Public Service Activities Marketing Leadership Group (1998-2001).

Service on Collaborative Learning Environment (CLE) subcommittee on Online Grading and Testing. Beta-tester for the CLE (1998-99).

Board of Directors, Alliance for Computers and Writing, 1995-96.

Reviewer for Electronic Journal of Communication (EJC/REC) November 1995 special issue on “Networked Virtual Realities (MOOs, MUDs, MUSEs, IRC, etc.) and Communication,” edited by Stephen Doheny-Farina.

Member of the inaugural Editorial Board of Kairos: A Journal for Teachers of Writing in Webbed Environments. Web-based journal published by D’Artagnan Communications Group and the Alliance for Computers and Writing, 1995-96.


ACTIVITIES: Selected Citations

“The Ballad of the Internet Nutball” doctoral dissertation is one of the subjects of a visual rhetoric study by Mary E. Hocks, “Understanding Visual Rhetoric in Digital Writing Environments,” in the June, 2003 issue of the Journal of College Composition and Communication

"To Blog or not To Blog" CNN.com HotBox column made DayPop Top 40 (blogtracking index of most linked articles) Sept 24, 2002.

Review of “Virtual Locker Room” chapter of Feminist Cyberscapes: Mapping Gendered Academic Spaces, Journal of College Composition and Communication, by Anne Wysocki, December 2000, p. 304.

trAce Online Writing Community Site of the Month for December 2000.
"Christine Boese is a US professor whose doctoral dissertation The Ballad of the Internet Nutball examines the phenomenon of the "Xenaverse" and fanfiction. Fascinating to Xena fans, scholars and anyone interested in writing on the Net." trace.ntu.ac.uk/picks.htm

Interviewed with direct quotations used in two full paragraphs in Sunday New York Times “Week in Review,” “A Not-So-Brave New World: Sci-Fi TV Runs Aground,” by J.D. Biersdorfer, February 6, 2000.

“The Ballad of the Internet Nutball” hypertextual doctoral dissertation is required reading for a graduate seminar in Qualitative Research Methods at Northern Arizona University & a graduate seminar in Media Studies at University of Wales, Cardiff.

“The Ballad of the Internet Nutball” hypertextual doctoral dissertation is the number two-ranked Xena link on Yahoo!, the most popular human indexing web portal, 1999 to present.

“The Ballad of the Internet Nutball” hypertextual doctoral dissertation was favorably reviewed in Eastgate Systems “Hypertext Kitchen,”1999.

“The Virtual Locker Room in Classroom Electronic Chat Spaces: The Politics of Men as Other.” was required reading for graduate seminar in Computers and Composition at the University of Louisville.


AFFILIATIONS: Past & Present

Beta-tester: Google Gmail, TypePad.com, Tribe.net, LinkedIn.com
Google AdSense program
Amazon Associate
International Communication Association
Association of Computing Machinery (ACM)
Modern Language Association
National Council for Teachers of English (College Composition and Communication)
Associated Writing Programs
Society of Professional Journalists, Sigma Delta Chi
National Press Photographers Association
University Commission on the Status of Women, UWEC 1984, one of two student appointees, when the commission won UW-System approval of the women’s studies minor.
Student Feminist Alliance, president, 1983-84
Alpha Lambda Delta, collegiate honor society
National Honor Society


REFERENCES & RENSSELAER-INTERFOLIO CREDENTIALS PORTFOLIO

Available upon request

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